Twitter
RSS
Facebook

CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS

CAR RENTALS – the following car rental agencies operate in Arusha:

Arusha Car Rental & Safaris: +255 782 411 622
Gladiola Safari Car Rental: +255 754 409 437
Mil Adventure Africa: +255 784 954 371
Savannah 4WD: +255 754 897 997
Serena Car Hire & Tours: +255 754 286 066
Shika Tours & Car Hire: +255 769 817 520


AIM Mall

AIM Mall

AIM Mall

AIM Mall (Dodoma Road, Highway A104, Arusha) – this is the closest there is to a real shopping mall in Arusha. Along with various retailers (from electronics to apparel, jewelry, etc.), there’s a food court offering various types of cuisines, a movie theater, and a kids play area.


And Beyond Klein’s Camp

And Beyond Klein’s Camp

And Beyond Klein’s Camp

And Beyond Klein’s Camp (Lobo, Serengeti National Park) — located in the northern Serengeti in a 10,000 hectare private sanctuary bordering Serengeti National Park to the west, Klein’s Camp is set on the edge of the Kuka Hills overlooking the wildebeest and zebra migration corridor linking the Serengeti and the Masai Mara in Kenya. It is near Lobo, about 120km from Seronera. The Camp has a large beautifully furnished open-sided bar / sitting area with a central fireplace a short walk from the dining room, both with sweeping views of the valleys and surrounding hills.

 

Arusha

Arusha

Arusha

Arusha (town) – the Tanzanian city of Arusha, whose population is over 400,000, is the capital of the Arusha Region and a hub for the area’s tourism. Arusha is within driving distance of eco-tourist destinations, like Mount Meru, Serengeti, Ngorongoro Crater, Lake Manyara, Tarangire National Park, and Mount Kilimanjaro.

Arusha has also earned its place in international diplomacy, making it an African version of Geneva. It hosts the East African Community and the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (who held trials for war criminals involved in the Rwandan genocide of 1994). UNICEF and the UN also have offices there.

And Beyond Grumeti Serengeti

And Beyond Grumeti Serengeti

And Beyond Grumeti Serengeti

And Beyond Grumeti Serengeti (Serengeti National Park) — Located in the remote Western Corridor of the Serengeti, “And Beyond Grumeti” Lodge provides a private Serengeti experience with exclusive game viewing in some of the most secluded parts of Africa’s most famous game reserve.

At its restaurant, local and international meals can be enjoyed on an extensive deck with beautiful views towards the river, while the dining area opens up to a traditional African boma, where dinner is served beneath a billion stars. Traditional fires known as jikos and outdoor ovens produce mouth-watering aromas, while the sounds of the African night provide a gentle backdrop to tales of the day’s safaris.

 

Arusha Declaration Museum

Arusha Declaration Museum

Arusha Declaration Museum

Arusha Declaration Museum (Makongoro Road by Uhuru Roundabout, Arusha) – this museum celebrates the country’s independence from British colonialism in 1961. It also highlights Tanzanian leader Julius Nyerere’s 1967 declaration calling for African self-reliance, socialism, and ujamaa (familyhood) — the philosophy that would guide Tanzania’s national development. The museum also chronicled the country’s colonial era (going back to Tanzania’s occupation by Germany during the late 19th & early 20th centuries). Some ethnographic artifacts are also on exhibit. Admission: 1,500 TZS (local adult), US$5.00 (foreign adult), 1,000 TZS (local college students), 500 TZS (local elementary & high school students), US$3.00 (foreign elementary/high school/college students). Hours: 9:00 am – 5:30 pm (daily).

Arusha Cultural Heritage Centre

Arusha Cultural Heritage Centre

Arusha Cultural Heritage Centre

Arusha Cultural Heritage Centre (Highway A104 & Dodoma Street, Arusha) –– housing a great selection of modern and antique art, the Arusha Cultural Heritage Centre is a place where Tanzania’s past mingles with its present. Explore the history of more than 100 tribes that inhabit the country and pick up carvings, books, gemstones and clothing to take home as souvenirs.

This centre also has an exquisite collection of precious and semi-precious stones – including rubies, emeralds, tsavorite, diamonds, sapphires and opals – from across the continent. Of these, its most highly treasured is Tanzanite – a rare blue/violet stone found only in Tanzania, which is highly sought after internationally. Visitors can purchase loose stones, select from its ranges of hand made jewelry or work with their expert jewelers & designers to create some unforgettable unique pieces. Free admission. Hours: 8:00 am – 5:00 pm daily.

About Serengeti

Serengeti

Serengeti

Serengeti National Park is a national park located in northwest Tanzania (to the west of the Mount Kilimanjaro region). The Park covers Tanzania’s Mara and Simiyu regions (an area of 14,750 sq, kilometers), and is known for the annual migration of over 1.5 million white-bearded wildebeest and 250,00 zebras, as well as numerous Nile Crocodiles and honey badgers.

The reason why the Park was set up by Tanzania’s British colonial rulers was their concern that (by the early 20th century) too many lions were being killed by foreigners engaging in safaris in northern Tanzania, threatening the local populations of lions. One visitor, American hunter Stewart Edward White, prompted such concerns when he conducted a three-month safari in the Serengeti region during the 1920s, where he and his companions shot 50 lions. In response, the British colonial authorities who governed over Tanzania at the time set up a partial game reserve of 800 acres in 1921 and a full one in 1929. Such actions resulted in the formal establishment of Serengeti National Park in 1951.

Re the Serengeti name, despite rumors that the Park was named after an Italian explorer or hunter, the name “Serengeti” actually come from the word used by the Maasai ethnic group (“siringet”) to describe an endless plain, or in their words “the place where the land runs forever”.

To help complete the process of making Serengeti National Park a full-fledged game reserve, the British authorities evicted the Maasai people from the Park in 1959, and relocated them to the Ngorongoto Conservation Area. These days, with Serengeti being the oldest national park in Tanzania, it is currently a major engine to Tanzania’s current tourism industry, driven by eco-tourists who wish to explore its natural wonders (including Mount Kilimanjaro and surrounding areas), as well as to conduct photo safaris of Serengeti’s diverse range of wildlife (which includes an estimated 2,500 lions and over a million wildebeest, as well as zebra, cheetahs, African leopards, elephants, rhinos, gazelle, impala, hartebeest, topi, buffalo, and waterbuck, among other species.

An estimated 350,000 tourists currently visit Serengeti National Park. Within the park, the only humans that are allowed to reside there are the staff of the Tanzania National Parks Authority, researchers & staff from the Frankfurt Zoological Society, and staff working in the various lodges, campsites and hotels within the Park. The main settlement of Seronera acts as the Park’s main headquarters and residence of much of the research staff. Due to the Park’s biodiversity and ecological significance, it has been listed by UNESCO as a World Heritage Site.

The westernmost part of the Park is a short distance from Lake Victoria. Because of recent droughts, the Tanzanian government is considering expanding Serengeti Park into Lake Victoria itself, in order to address concerns about droughts in the near future and their potential impact on the local wildlife.